Parents of minor children who are considering divorce often worry about the effect on their children. Although the statistics can be grim, parents in Arkansas can mitigate the harm to their children by following the advice of child psychiatrists when handling issues that arise during their divorce.

Parents need to let their children know that they can love both parents without upsetting either one. Children need to forge strong bonds with both parents regardless of their parents’ relationships with each other. It is best if children are allowed to communicate all of their feelings, both negative and positive, without judgment or criticism. If children have a close and loving relationship with a step-parent, it is ideal if they can continue that relationship. Having someone they love disappear suddenly and completely is traumatic and should be avoided if possible.

Though it may be hard for parents to agree, rules should be consistent across households. Parents should communicate with each other and jointly decide what is and is not acceptable and the consequences for breaking rules. If there are harsh consequences at one house and lax rules at the other, children will understandably be confused.

Continuing to do things as a family can help alleviate a lot of the grief that children may suffer because of divorce. If they can see that they still have a family to celebrate their important milestones together, it will go a long way toward helping them cope. Parents should make every effort to jointly attend events that are meaningful to their children. No child wants to be put in the position of having to choose sides. Navigating through all of these issues can be difficult for divorcing parents, and they may benefit from the advice of lawyers who are experienced in family law.